Chemistry

Introduction to C-H acidic compounds

Introduction to C-H acidic compounds


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Hydrogen-deuterium exchange

In the case of enolizable carbonyl compounds, the keto-enol equilibrium (tautomerization) leads to an interchangeability of the α-hydrogen atoms. This can easily be demonstrated by treatment with isotopes. Is used, for example, at 1H-NMR measurement of an enolizable carbonyl compound D2O used as a solvent, the large excess of the deuterium leads to a complete exchange of all α-hydrogen atoms and so the corresponding signals of these protons are no longer present in the spectrum.


Organic substance classes & # 8211 the carbohydrates, general introduction

Carbohydrates can be broken down into simple sugars (technical term: monosaccharides, general structural formula: C n H 2n O n, e.g. fructose or grape sugar), double sugars (technical term: disaccharides, general structural formula: C n H 2n-2 O n-1, e.g. malt, Milk or household sugar) and multiple sugars (technical term: polysaccharides, general structural formula: C n H 2n-2 O n-1, e.g. vegetable or animal starch).

Linking individual monosaccharides results in disaccharides, if more than two monosaccharides accumulate on each other, an oligosaccharide is created, with a large number of monosaccharides polysaccharides are formed.

Carbohydrates can only be processed by the body in the form of monosaccharides, so that all other carbohydrates are broken down into these with the help of.


2. What is a mass spectrometer?

Methods for measuring the mass of atoms and molecules are referred to as mass spectrometry. According to this, the mass spectrometer is a device for determining the mass of atoms and molecules. It also records the mass spectra of particle mixtures and isotopes of an element. To make this possible, one resorts to the use of electric and magnetic fields. The pulse selectivity of magnetic fields and the energy selectivity of electrical fields are used. In this case one speaks of a mass spectrometer or a mass spectrometer, but there is no significant difference between them.

2.1 The history of the mass spectograph

In the early 19th century, the British chemist William Prout put forward the first hypothesis on mass spectrometry. This states that it is a property of the atom to have a certain mass. He made this claim after making several observations on atoms with respect to mass. Around 1858 Julius Plücker observed the influence of magnetic fields on the glow of discharge tubes. In 1897 Joseph John Thomson carried out experiments in which he deflected electric beams from various cathode metals with electromagnetic fields in electron tubes. Thereby it derived equations for the relationship between mass, speed and orbit radius. Francis William Aston, a student of Joseph John Thomson, built and developed the first working mass spectograph with a crossed electric and magnetic field in 1919. This enabled him to observe isotopes of chlorine and other atoms. In 1922 he was honored with the Nobel Prize for his research on isotopes. In 1918 the first modern mass spectograph was designed and built, it worked 100 times more precisely than all models designed so far. This is still used today as a template for the design of today's mass spectrographs.

2.2 The structure of a mass spectograph

Roughly speaking, a mass spectograph consists of three main components, the ion source, a detector, and an analyzer. Each of these components exists in different variants and designs. (see Appendix Fig. 1)

2.2.1 The ion source

The substance to be analyzed is ionized in the ion source. An electron is removed from an atom so that the atom remains as a positively charged ion. This process can be carried out with different methods, this depends mainly on the properties of the particles to be analyzed. The ions can be generated in a wide variety of ways. This is often done through impact ionization or chemical ionization. In impact ionization, the electrons of the atoms are "knocked out" by artificially accelerated electrons. In chemical ionization, on the other hand, energy is added to the atom with an electron beam until ions are generated at it. Other methods of ionization are, for example, photon ionization, matrix-assisted laser ionization and so-called fast atom bombardment.

2.2.2 The analyzer

In the analyzer, the ions obtained from the ion source are separated according to their mass-to-charge ratio. This can be done again in the most varied of ways, for example in the sector field mass spectograph or in the time-of-flight mass spectrophotometer. The respective mass spectographers are classified according to the characteristics of the analyzers.

2.2.3 The detector

The previously separated ions are recorded in the detector. Faraday receivers or Daly detectors can be used to detect the ions. There are three ways of detecting the ions.

The ions fly in their deflection radius onto a photo plate and blacken it. The frequency of the ions can now be determined on the basis of the degree of blackness.

The mass spectrum of the ions is recorded very precisely in the Faraday collector. To make this possible, the Faraday pendants, also known as Faraday pots, convert the kinetic energy of the ions into electrical energy. The frequency of the ions can now be calculated using the resulting current strength, as this is proportional to the frequency of the ions.

2.3 How a mass spectograph works

The mass spectrograph (see Appendix, Figure 2) is used because you want to know the mass of certain particles. In order to make this possible, charged ions emerge from an ion source in the form of an ion beam; these initially have different speeds. This then enters an electric field generated by a capacitor, which in turn is permeated by a magnetic field. Here, the positively charged ions are deflected downwards by the force (F = Q * E) of the electric field, and by the force ( F = Q * v * B) deflected upwards by the magnetic field. If the two forces succeed in balancing each other out, the ion beam passes through the fields that are perpendicular to one another and flies through an exit slit on the opposite side. The two fields serve as a speed filter. All particles that manage to leave the exit slit have the same speed. If these particles now enter a second magnetic field, the differences in the orbit radius can only be explained by differences in the charge of the particles and not by their speed differences. If these ions all have the same charge, however, deviations in the orbital radius can only result from different masses of the ions. The specific charge of the particles can now be determined by given factors. If you have measured the radius of the particle orbit and know the charge and speed of the particle, as well as the magnetic flux density of the field, you can calculate the ion mass.

Figure not included in this excerpt

Above all, this made it possible to establish that almost elements consist of different isotopes.

2.4 Areas of application of a mass spectrometer

Mass spectrometry is primarily used as an analysis method for chemical elements in chemistry. Among other things, they are used in biology, archeology and climatology in order to be able to analyze materials. When it comes to determining the masses of particles and atoms, mass spectographers are mainly used in particle physics. In addition, it detects particles that are still unknown.

2.4.1 Areas of application in chemistry

In chemistry, the method of mass spectrometry is mainly used to elucidate the structure and composition of compounds and mixtures. The method of mass spectrometry is mainly used in analytical chemistry. It is used to determine the molar mass of compounds and the molecular formula of molecules. The importance of mass spectrometry in analytical chemistry is therefore much greater than that in physics, because this merely provides the knowledge and the basis for our project.

2.4.2 Areas of application in climatology

In climatology, the mass spectograph is primarily used to determine certain isotopes in substances in order to draw conclusions about the climate in the past. The frequency of certain isotopes in sedimentary layers indicates this past of our climate. A good example of this is the isotope 016 that occurs in water, which causes the water to evaporate more easily than isotope that contains the isotope O18.

2.4.3 Areas of application in archeology

In archeology, isotope ratios of elements are examined with the help of the mass spectrometer, whereby conclusions can be drawn about people of the past millennia. For this purpose, bone finds are examined for these relationships. An example of this is the ratio of C14 to C12, which allows conclusions to be drawn about the time of plant formation.


Data and facts - at a glance

For the summer semester: by January 15th

For the winter semester: from April 15th to July 31st

The course is technically and scientifically oriented and includes chemistry, paint technology, application technology and measurement and testing technology.

Application / admission

Step by step to application and admission

The application for this degree course runs through the nationwide application portal Hochschulstart.de.

All information on the admission requirements and the application process can be found on the application pages for bachelor's degree programs.

Course of studies - modules

General Chemistry

requirements:
compulsory: knowledge of school
Recommended: preliminary courses in mathematics and physics

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...

Knowledge and understanding
• Understand the basics of chemistry.
• Set up chemical reaction equations and carry out stoichiometric calculations.
• Carry out basic chemical work independently in the laboratory.
• Prepare protocols for the laboratory tests.
• Understand further lectures on the subject areas of chemistry.
• Perform basic calculations in chemistry.

Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
• apply the basics of chemistry in practice.
• Apply chemical laws.
• Recognize and classify chemical relationships.
• Analyze chemical problems and derive or develop solutions.
• Calculate laboratory batches.
• familiarize themselves with new ideas and topics based on their basic knowledge.
• Understand chemical issues.

Scientific innovation
• familiarize yourself with other methods of chemistry.
• Acquire knowledge in other subject areas.

Communication and cooperation
• Present and discuss technical content.
• Communicate and cooperate in the group in order to find adequate solutions for the task at hand.

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• give theoretical and methodological reasons for the approach that has been developed.
• reflect on and assess one's own abilities in a group comparison.

Content / sub-modules:
a) Lecture General Chemistry:
Atomic structure, electron shell, periodic table of the elements, stoichiometric calculations, setting up reaction equations, ionic bonds, atomic bonds, hybridization, geometry of molecules, hydrogen bonds, metal bonds, gases, liquids, acids and bases, pH value calculations, buffers, oxidation number, redox reactions, Nernst 'cal equation, electrolysis, electrochemical power generation, complex chemistry.
b) General Chemistry Laboratory:
Independent execution of experiments on the subjects of titration (acid, precipitation, redox, complexometry), potentiometry, electrogravimetry, solubility product, steam distillation, photometry, AAS, qualitative analysis of cations and anions, preparation of preparations.
Theoretical basics of the laboratory experiments in the seminar.

Examination performance / course performance:
Written exam 120 min (graded) all attempts successfully passed with report

Organic chemistry 1

Requirements:
compulsory: knowledge of school

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...

Knowledge and understanding
• Demonstrate basic knowledge of organic chemistry.
• Describe the basics of organic reactions.
• Recognize the importance of organic chemistry.
• Explain and understand the basic procedure for naming organic molecules.
• Understand the stereochemical relationships in organic chemistry.
• explain the most important reaction mechanisms in organic chemistry.

Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
• understand the basics of organic chemistry.
• Recognize and classify organic relationships.
• Apply, transfer and explain organic mechanisms.
• familiarize themselves with new ideas and topics based on their basic knowledge.

Communication and cooperation
• interpret simple results of organic chemistry and draw valid conclusions.
• Present organic content and discuss it professionally and communicate in the group in order to find adequate solutions for the task at hand.

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• Theoretically and methodically justify the solution that has been developed and reflect and assess one's own abilities in a group comparison.

Content / sub-modules:
a) Lecture Organic Chemistry 1:
Introduction: Ionic bond, covalent bond, atomic and molecular orbitals, hybridization, functional groups in the organ. chemistry
Alkanes: n-alkanes, homologous series, representation and physical properties, constitutional and configurational isomerism, radical substitution of alkanes, cycloalkanes, polycyclic rings.
Stereochemistry: configuration isomerism, chiral molecules, enantiomers, polarimetry, relative and absolute configuration, diastereomers, Fischer projection, separation of enantiomers.
Haloalkanes: Representation of haloalkanes, reactions of haloalkanes, Sn1 and Sn2 reaction, stereochemical effects.
Alkenes: sp² hybrid, cis-trans isomerism, representation of alkenes, reactions of alkenes, electrophilic addition.
Alkynes: sp hybrid, preparation, reactions of alkynes
Aromatic compounds: benzene, aromaticity, Hückel rule, nomenclature.
Electrophilic substitution on aromatics: single substitution, halogenation, nitration, sulfonation, Friedel-Crafts alkylation, Friedel-Crafts acylation
Alcohols: pka value, representation of alcohols, Grignard compounds, retrosynthesis, reactions of alcohols, oxidation reactions, esterification, substitution reactions.
Aldehydes and ketones: preparation, reactions, addition of nucleophilic reagents, acetalization, oxidation and reduction reactions, keto-enol tautomerism and its reactions.
Ethers and thiols: representation, reactions of ethers, cyclic ethers, properties and reactions of thiols and sulfides.
Carboxylic acids: acidity, pka value, synthesis of acids, reactions of carboxylic acids, soap production, esterification, dicarboxylic acids, reduction reactions.
Carboxylic acid derivatives: carboxylic acid esters, carboxylic acid amides, carboxylic acid anhydrides, acid chlorides of carboxylic acids, nitriles. Nomenclature and the main reactions
Amines: structure and nomenclature

Examination performance / course performance:
Exam 90 minutes (graded)

Physics (lecture)

Requirements:
required: school knowledge of mathematics and physics
Recommended, depending on the level of knowledge: preliminary course in mathematics / preliminary course in physics / modules of the 1st to 2nd semester

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...
Knowledge and understanding
•… demonstrate basic knowledge in the field of physics
• ... comprehend elementary physical / technical basic principles in terms of content
• ... describe and explain physical / technical processes in the applied technology
• ... recognize the application and importance of physical principles in further technical development

Use, application and generation of knowledge

Use and transfer
• ... understand the fundamentals of physics and apply the laws of physics
• ... recognize, classify and analyze physical / technical relationships and problems
• ... describe technical processes qualitatively and quantitatively with the help of basic physical laws
•… use measuring devices sensibly
•… estimate and quantify measurement uncertainties
•… evaluate measured values ​​using suitable methods and display them in accordance with the standards
•… assess whether promises of technical properties and specifications are possible in principle

Scientific innovation
• ... familiarize yourself with new ideas and topics based on your basic physical knowledge
• ... independently develop approaches for concepts for solving technical tasks and assess their suitability

Communication and cooperation
• ... explain physical / technical processes using the standard designations and terms
•… communicate and cooperate in the laboratory group in order to find adequate solutions for the tasks at hand
•… present the results of laboratory experiments and discuss them with other people

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• ... justify the application of physical principles in technical contexts theoretically and methodically
•… document measurement results from the laboratory in a comprehensible and comprehensible manner

Content / sub-modules:
a) Lecture:
Mechanics: Kinematic principles, force, momentum, work, energy, power, conservation laws, impact processes, rotary movements
Mechanics of fluids: Hydrostatics, gravity pressure in liquids and gases Ideal fluids: Continuity equation, Bernoulli equation Real fluids: friction, viscosity, pipe friction, turbulence, similarity
Electricity: charge, coulomb force, electric field, dipole, potential, simple circuits, resistance
Oscillation theory: periodic processes, equation of motion, free and forced harmonic oscillation, damping, resonance
Wave theory: basic concepts, energy transport, propagation, interference
Optics: Geometric optics: imaging, mirrors, lenses, refraction, simple devices (e.g. microscope) Wave optics: reflection, dispersion, interference, diffraction, polarization, radiation

b) laboratory:
Experiments on the topics:
Electricity: voltage, current, resistance, fields
Optics: diffraction, polarization
Vibrations and waves: resonance, damping, wave propagation, standing waves
Thermodynamics: ideal / real gas, calorimetry, changes of state
Fluid mechanics: viscosity
Demonstration experiments: scanning electron microscope

Examination performance / course performance:
a), b) written exam 120 min (graded)
b) all attempts successfully passed with report and oral examination (presentation 10 min)

Shape and Color Theory (1)

Requirements:
School knowledge

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...

Knowledge and understanding
• ... explain the basic procedure of shape and color theory and understand the relationships within (color) design.
• ... have basic knowledge of physics, chemistry, physiology and psychology and aesthetics on the subject of color.
• ... recognize the importance of the design elements form and material for the color design.
•… understand and explain color theories and color ordering systems.

Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
•… apply the laws of subtractive and additive color mixing.
•… create color-specific reports and presentations.
• ... understand designs as visual signs and analyze them according to the principles of semiotics.
• ... recognize and classify relationships between color phenomena.
• ... understand the basics of color theory.
• ... analyze aesthetic problems and derive or develop solutions.
•… take different perspectives and points of view towards a situation, weigh them up against each other and make an assessment.
• ... familiarize themselves with new ideas and topics based on their basic knowledge.

Scientific innovation
•… apply methods and tools in order to gain comprehensible, factual new knowledge in the evaluation of designs.
• ... independently develop approaches for new design concepts and assess their suitability.
•… develop concepts for optimizing design drafts.

Communication and cooperation
• ... actively communicate within an organization and obtain information.
•… interpret the results of shape and color theory and draw admissible conclusions.
•… use the knowledge, skills and competencies you have learned to evaluate designs and interpret them according to other criteria.
• ... research, present, document and discuss content.

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• ... give a theoretical and methodological explanation for the solution that has been developed.
•… reflect on and assess one's own abilities in a group comparison.

Contents:
a), b), c) Lecture and thesis Form and Color Theory 1 and 2:
The lecture deals with the cultural-historical significance of color on the one hand as a sensory impression of our environment and on the other hand as a means of expressing human creativity and is divided into four chapters.
Basics of perception and aesthetics
Perception is a subjective process and the concept of the beautiful is relative. Fashions, style epochs and basic aesthetic values ​​can be derived from the changing concept of beauty, traditions can be recognized and the changes brought about by the impulses of modernity can be understood. With the methods of communication theory, it is possible to evaluate design tasks on the basis of a comprehensible and factual justification. This is an essential basic skill for self-critical work.
shape
Color requires a color carrier. The basics of shape theory and the representation of the design elements point, line, surface, body and space convey the principles of two- and three-dimensional designs.
material
Color is material. The appearance of a surface depends on several factors. In addition to the material aspect of binders, solvents, pigments and additives, this is the interplay of structures, textures and invoices as well as the selected application technology and the devices and aids used.
colour
In the German language, color includes both a color appearance and a coloring substance. The theories for explaining sensory perception are therefore diverse. One focus of the lecture is the imparting of the current state of knowledge in the field of color theories. Connections and findings to and from the disciplines of physics, chemistry, physiology, psychology, economics and business administration, craft, printing technology and aesthetics demonstrate the interdisciplinary nature of color.
In addition to the event, the students give presentations lasting approx. 20 minutes. The choice of topics is based on free choice and consultation with the lecturer. The aim of the contributions is to gain insights into the enormous world of the professional field of color and, through the presentation and careful documentation, an introduction to independent work according to scientific standards and quality criteria.
During the semester, the students create a project work in the form of a three-dimensional object. The developed theory of form and color theory can thus be combined with the practical design process and the structured working method of professional (color) design.
Theoretical knowledge is tested in an exam at the end of the 2nd semester.

Examination performance / course performance:
a) and b) written exam 60 min (ungraded)
c) Student thesis and presentation / documentation (graded)

Mathematics

requirements

required: school knowledge of mathematics
recommended: preliminary course in mathematics

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...

Knowledge and understanding
•… demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the elementary fundamentals of mathematics.
• ... have knowledge of important mathematical concepts from linear algebra, differential and integral calculus.
•… demonstrate skills in the application of important mathematical methods.
• ... understand the importance of mathematical concepts for application in science and technology.

Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
•… apply mathematical methods and concepts to questions in science and technology.
• ... describe and analyze scientific and technical problems quantitatively.
• ... recognize and classify the type of problem.
•… put together complex solution methods from simple (known) building blocks.
•… interpret and evaluate results or solutions.

Scientific innovation
• ... familiarize yourself with new ideas and topics based on your basic mathematical knowledge.
• ... develop independent approaches to solving quantitative problems and assess their suitability.

Communication and cooperation
• ... describe and present mathematical facts and results with appropriate precision.

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• ... justify the use of concrete mathematical methods in a scientific and technical environment.

Content / sub-modules:

a) Lecture:
Elementary fundamentals of algebra, geometry and trigonometry
Linear algebra: systems of linear equations, vectors and matrices
Differential calculus for functions with one / more variables
Integral calculus for functions with one variable

Examination performance / study performance

Physics (lecture)

Requirements:
required: school knowledge of mathematics and physics
Recommended, depending on the level of knowledge: preliminary course in mathematics / preliminary course in physics / modules of the 1st to 2nd semester

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...
Knowledge and understanding
•… demonstrate basic knowledge in the field of physics
• ... comprehend elementary physical / technical basic principles in terms of content
• ... describe and explain physical / technical processes in the applied technology
• ... recognize the application and importance of physical principles in further technical development

Use, application and generation of knowledge

Use and transfer
• ... understand the fundamentals of physics and apply the laws of physics
• ... recognize, classify and analyze physical / technical relationships and problems
• ... describe technical processes qualitatively and quantitatively with the help of basic physical laws
•… use measuring devices sensibly
•… estimate and quantify measurement uncertainties
•… evaluate measured values ​​using suitable methods and display them in accordance with the standards
•… assess whether promises of technical properties and specifications are possible in principle

Scientific innovation
• ... familiarize yourself with new ideas and topics based on your basic physical knowledge
• ... independently develop approaches for concepts for solving technical tasks and assess their suitability

Communication and cooperation
• ... explain physical / technical processes using the standard designations and terms
•… communicate and cooperate in the laboratory group in order to find adequate solutions for the tasks at hand
•… present the results of laboratory experiments and discuss them with other people

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• ... justify the application of physical principles in technical contexts theoretically and methodically
• ... document measurement results from the laboratory in a comprehensible and comprehensible manner

Content / sub-modules:
a) Lecture:
Mechanics: Kinematic principles, force, momentum, work, energy, power, conservation laws, impact processes, rotary movements
Mechanics of fluids: Hydrostatics, gravity pressure in liquids and gases Ideal fluids: Continuity equation, Bernoulli equation Real fluids: friction, viscosity, pipe friction, turbulence, similarity
Electricity: charge, coulomb force, electric field, dipole, potential, simple circuits, resistance
Oscillation theory: periodic processes, equation of motion, free and forced harmonic oscillation, damping, resonance
Wave theory: basic concepts, energy transport, propagation, interference
Optics: Geometric optics: imaging, mirrors, lenses, refraction, simple devices (e.g. microscope) Wave optics: reflection, dispersion, interference, diffraction, polarization, radiation

b) laboratory:
Experiments on the topics:
Electricity: voltage, current, resistance, fields
Optics: diffraction, polarization
Vibrations and waves: resonance, damping, wave propagation, standing waves
Thermodynamics: ideal / real gas, calorimetry, changes of state
Fluid mechanics: viscosity
Demonstration experiments: scanning electron microscope

Examination performance / course performance:
a), b) written exam 120 min (graded)
b) all attempts successfully passed with report and oral examination (presentation 10 min)

Physical chemistry

Requirements:
Compulsory: All modules of the first semester (general chemistry, organic chemistry, mathematics, physics)
Recommended: Study of literature, preliminary course in methematics, preliminary course in physics

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...

Knowledge and understanding
• ... explain the basic approach in physical chemistry and understand the relationships within the subject.
•… describe the basics of thermodynamics and reaction kinetics.
•… have basic knowledge of thermodynamics and reaction kinetics.
• ... recognize the importance of thermodynamics and reaction kinetics.
•. Demonstrate basic knowledge of catalysis.
• ... understand thermal and caloric equations of state and physical chemical texts.
• ... understand and explain the basic terms of reaction kinetics and chemical thermodynamics.
• ... understand the axioms of thermodynamics.
•. Understand and explain phase diagrams such as p-V, p-T, melting and boiling diagrams.
•. Understand and explain colligative phenomena.

Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
•. apply basic physico-chemical working methods.
• ... recognize and classify chemical-physical-mathematical relationships.
• ... determine reaction orders
•. Calculate reaction rates at different temperatures using the Arrhenius equation.
•. Calculate reaction conversions as a function of time.
• ... analyze problems of reaction kinetics and chemical thermodynamics and develop solutions.
•. Calculate thermal expansions and pressure changes in all aggregate states.
•. apply the equations of the kinetic gas theory, especially for the estimation of heat capacities.
•. Apply virial equations and the van der Waals equation.
•. Use p-V, p-T, melting and boiling diagrams for process development and control.
•. calculate the heat exchange in physical and chemical processes.
•. Calculate changes in enthalpy, entropy, and internal energy.
•. Calculate free reaction enthalpies, reaction entropies and energies.
•. Calculate chemical equilibrium constants as a function of temperature as well as concentrations and activities.
•. apply the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to calculate phase equilibria.
•. Calculate mixed phase equilibria.
•. Calculate entropies, enthalpies and free enthalpies as a function of temperature.
•. Evaluate cryoscopic, ebullioscopic and osmotic measurement data.
•. calculate electrochemical equilibria.
• ... familiarize yourself with new subject areas based on your basic knowledge, in particular spectroscopy, colloid chemistry, surface chemistry, enzyme kinetics, and process technology.

Scientific innovation
•… apply methods and tools to gain new knowledge in the field of physical chemistry.

Communication and cooperation
•… interpret content and results, discuss them professionally and draw conclusions.
•… communicate and cooperate in the group in order to find adequate solutions for a given task.

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• ... give a theoretical and methodological explanation of the approach that has been developed.
• ... reflect on and assess one's own abilities in a group comparison.

Contents:
Basic terms, reaction speed, reaction order, Arrhenius equation, equations of state, gas theory of ideal and real gases, main principles of thermodynamics, internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, heat capacity, heat exchange, thermochemistry, free enthalpy, free energy, chemical potential, chemical equilibrium, law of mass action, solubility product, Nernst 'cal equation, phase equilibria, Clausius-Clapeyro equation, air humidity, mixed phase equilibria, phase diagrams, colligative properties, electrochemical equilibria

Examination performance / course performance:
Exam 90 min. (Graded)

Organic chemistry 2

Requirements:
Compulsory: Organic Chemistry 1, General Chemistry
recommended: lectures from the 1st semester

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...
Knowledge and understanding
• ... explain the basic procedure for describing reaction mechanisms and the relationships within the

Understand organic chemistry
•… describe the basics of organic reaction mechanisms.
• ... name and carry out basic practical operation methods for the practical production of organic preparations.
• ... understand and carry out the practical and preparative manual skills.
• ... understand and describe the handling, use and disposal of hazardous substances in the laboratory.
• ... describe the theoretical and practical basics of organic reactions.
• ... recognize the importance of theoretical and practical organic chemistry.
• ... understand the stereochemical relationships in organic chemistry and deepen them in the practical.
• ... explain the most important reaction mechanisms in organic chemistry and implement them in the practical.
•… demonstrate basic knowledge in macromolecular chemistry
• ... recognize the importance of macromolecular chemistry.
• ... understand and explain the different synthesis methods of macromolecules.
• ... understand and explain the characterization and processing of macromolecules.

Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
•… keep a laboratory journal and create presentations on the subject.
• ... recognize and classify relationships.
• ... analyze problems related to organic and macromolecular chemistry and derive or develop solutions.
•… take different perspectives and points of view towards a situation, weigh them up against each other and make an assessment.
• ... familiarize themselves with new ideas and topics based on their basic knowledge.

Communication and cooperation
• ... actively communicate within an organization and obtain information.
•… interpret results in organic chemistry and draw valid conclusions.
•… use the knowledge, skills and competencies you have learned to evaluate organic chemistry and interpret them from other points of view.
•… present topics in organic and macromolecular chemistry and discuss them professionally.
•… communicate and cooperate in the group in order to find adequate solutions for the task at hand.

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• ... derive decision recommendations from a social and ethical perspective based on the analyzes and evaluations learned.
• ... give a theoretical and methodological explanation of the approach that has been developed.
• ... reflect on and assess one's own abilities in a group comparison.

a) Lecture Macromolecular Chemistry:
Ability to basic definitions of macromolecules, mastery of the nomenclature of polymers, of step reactions - polycondensations and polyadditions: mechanism of step reactions, definition of the gel point, typical examples (phenoplasts, aminoplasts, polyurethanes, epoxy resins.
Ability to interpret the mechanism, the kinetics of the polymerization, the molecular weight and the distribution in radical polymerization.
Ability to interpret ionic polymerization, general characteristics, cationic polymerization, anionic polymerization, ring-opening anionic and cationic polymerizations, molecular weight and distribution.
Ability to place the copolymerization, the stereochemistry of polymers and the polymer-analogous reactions in context.

b) Lecture Organic Chemistry 2
Ability to understand, apply and transfer in-depth selected chapters of organic chemistry. These would be, for example, the mechanisms for nucleophilic substitution on the saturated carbon atom, and for elimination, for electrophilic and nucleophilic substitution and, in particular, multiple substitution on aromatic compounds, and here especially the influence of first and second substituents on allylic systems and for comparability with reactions of conjugated systems , and reactions of carboxylic acid derivatives and amines.

c) Laboratory: Organic Chemistry:
Ability in the internship to independently produce simple organic preparations on the basis of organic regulations. Assemblies of the most important standard equipment are used for this purpose. Ability to carry out simple cleaning methods and identify the substances. Ability to safely handle chemical substances; to do this, they must look for the symbols for the hazardous substances used in the laboratory and get to know the associated H and P phrases. Ability to safely handle and apply appropriate disposal measures for the chemicals used. Ability to develop and present a report with a given organic topic.
Experiment 1: distillation and characterization
Experiment 2: reactions on double bond.
Experiment 3: Nucleophilic Substitution
Experiment 4: reaction of alcohols
Experiment 5: Electrophilic substitution on aromatics
Experiment 6: Reactions of carbonyl compounds
Experiment 7: Organometallic reactions
Experiment 8: polycondensation reaction and thin layer chromatography

Examination performance / course performance:
a), b) and c) Written exam 120 min (graded) including oral examination 10 min (graded)
c) all attempts successfully passed with report and presentation

Inorganic chemistry, occupational health and safety and environmental law

Requirements:
Compulsory: Lecture General Chemistry

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...

Knowledge and understanding
• know the position of the elements in the periodic table and their chemistry.
• know the elements of the periodic table and their basic chemical reactions.
• know the most important large-scale inorganic compounds and their production.
• Know the inorganic compounds that are used in paints and varnishes.
• know the properties of inorganic pigments and fillers.
• Be able to set up reaction equations and calculate laboratory approaches for inorganic chemistry.
• Name the legal structure of occupational safety in the EU and in Germany.
• Understand the importance of different levels of technology in German law.
• Explain the central role of the accident insurance institutions and the central requirements of occupational health and safety law.
• Name the most important ordinances and regulations in the area of ​​hazardous substances and explain the associated legal requirements for the registration and labeling of chemicals.
• reflect the structure and structure of the interdisciplinary discipline of environmental protection law and explain the importance of environmental protection law for different industrial sectors.

Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
• Classify and understand inorganic pigments and inorganic fillers.
• Know the element compounds that are used in paints and varnishes and for what purpose they are used.
• Assess the differences between water and organic solvents for the production of corresponding paints.
• Use knowledge of inorganic compounds.
• Understand and classify metals and their properties.
• Understand the basics of pre-treating metals prior to coating.
• Classify the central importance of the topic of occupational safety and environmental protection for the different areas of the future world of work.
• Explain the interrelationships between legal norms and assess which obligations arise in the area of ​​occupational safety and environmental protection for employees and employers.

Communication and cooperation
• Communicate and cooperate in the group in order to find adequate solutions for the task at hand.
• Discuss case studies to get a better understanding of the legal system.

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• give theoretical and methodological reasons for the approach that has been developed.
• reflect on and assess one's own abilities in a group comparison.

Contents:
a) Lecture Inorganic Chemistry / Inorganic Materials:
Inorganic chemistry of the main and subgroups of the periodic table, large-scale, inorganic processes, inorganic materials: pigments and fillers, metallic materials (steels, aluminum, alloys), glass, ceramics.
b) Lecture occupational safety and environmental law:
Legal structure in the EU and in Germany. Federal and state regulations. Anchoring the different levels of technology in German law. REACH and CLP - law structure, registration of new substances, labeling of hazardous substances. Labor law requirements and obligations. Central importance of the accident insurance carriers in Germany. Differentiation between liability and criminal law. Importance of occupational exposure limits. Structure and structure of environmental law in Europe and Germany, pollution control, basics of recycling and waste management.

Examination performance / course performance:
a) and b) written exam 90 min (graded)

Shape and Color Theory (2)

Requirements:
School knowledge

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...

Knowledge and understanding
• ... explain the basic procedure of shape and color theory and understand the relationships within (color) design.
• ... have basic knowledge of physics, chemistry, physiology and psychology and aesthetics on the subject of color.
• ... recognize the importance of the design elements form and material for the color design.
•… understand and explain color theories and color ordering systems.

Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
•… apply the laws of subtractive and additive color mixing.
•… create color-specific reports and presentations.
• ... understand designs as visual signs and analyze them according to the principles of semiotics.
• ... recognize and classify relationships between color phenomena.
• ... understand the basics of color theory.
• ... analyze aesthetic problems and derive or develop solutions.
•… take different perspectives and points of view towards a situation, weigh them up against each other and make an assessment.
• ... familiarize themselves with new ideas and topics based on their basic knowledge.

Scientific innovation
•… apply methods and tools in order to gain comprehensible, factual new knowledge in the evaluation of designs.
• ... independently develop approaches for new design concepts and assess their suitability.
•… develop concepts for optimizing design drafts.

Communication and cooperation
• ... actively communicate within an organization and obtain information.
•… interpret the results of shape and color theory and draw admissible conclusions.
•… use the knowledge, skills and competencies you have learned to evaluate designs and interpret them according to other criteria.
• ... research, present, document and discuss content.

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• ... give a theoretical and methodological explanation for the solution that has been developed.
•… reflect on and assess one's own abilities in a group comparison.

Content / sub-modules:
a), b), c) Lecture and thesis Form and Color Theory 1 and 2:
The lecture deals with the cultural-historical significance of color on the one hand as a sensory impression of our environment and on the other hand as a means of expressing human creativity and is divided into four chapters.
Basics of perception and aesthetics
Perception is a subjective process and the concept of the beautiful is relative. Fashions, style epochs and basic aesthetic values ​​can be derived from the changing concept of beauty, traditions can be recognized and the changes brought about by the impulses of modernity can be understood. With the methods of communication theory, it is possible to evaluate design tasks on the basis of a comprehensible and factual justification. This is an essential basic skill for self-critical work.
shape
Color requires a color carrier. The basics of shape theory and the representation of the design elements point, line, surface, body and space convey the principles of two- and three-dimensional designs.
material
Color is material. The appearance of a surface depends on several factors. In addition to the material aspect of binders, solvents, pigments and additives, this is the interplay of structures, textures and invoices as well as the selected application technology and the devices and aids used.
colour
In the German language, color includes both a color appearance and a coloring substance. The theories for explaining sensory perception are therefore diverse. One focus of the lecture is the imparting of the current state of knowledge in the field of color theories. Connections and findings to and from the disciplines of physics, chemistry, physiology, psychology, economics and business administration, craft, printing technology and aesthetics demonstrate the interdisciplinary nature of color.
In addition to the event, the students give presentations lasting approx. 20 minutes. The choice of topics is based on free choice and consultation with the lecturer. The aim of the contributions is to gain insights into the enormous world of the professional field of color and, through the presentation and careful documentation, an introduction to independent work according to scientific standards and quality criteria.
During the semester, the students create a project work in the form of a three-dimensional object. The developed theory of form and color theory can thus be combined with the practical design process and the structured working method of professional (color) design.
Theoretical knowledge is tested in an exam at the end of the 2nd semester.

Examination performance / course performance:
a) and b) written exam 60 min (ungraded)
c) Student thesis and presentation / documentation (graded)

Physics (laboratory)

Requirements:
required: school knowledge of mathematics and physics
Recommended, depending on the level of knowledge: preliminary course in mathematics / preliminary course in physics / modules of the 1st to 2nd semester

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...

Knowledge and understanding
•… demonstrate basic knowledge in the field of physics
• ... comprehend elementary physical / technical basic principles in terms of content
• ... describe and explain physical / technical processes in the applied technology
• ... recognize the application and importance of physical principles in further technical development

Use, application and generation of knowledge

Use and transfer
• ... understand the fundamentals of physics and apply the laws of physics
• ... recognize, classify and analyze physical / technical relationships and problems
• ... describe technical processes qualitatively and quantitatively with the help of basic physical laws
•… use measuring devices sensibly
•… estimate and quantify measurement uncertainties
•… evaluate measured values ​​using suitable methods and display them in accordance with the standards
•… assess whether promises of technical properties and specifications are possible in principle

Scientific innovation
• ... familiarize yourself with new ideas and topics based on your basic physical knowledge
• ... independently develop approaches for concepts for solving technical tasks and assess their suitability

Communication and cooperation
• ... explain physical / technical processes using the standard designations and terms
•… communicate and cooperate in the laboratory group in order to find adequate solutions for the tasks at hand
•… present the results of laboratory experiments and discuss them with other people

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• ... justify the application of physical principles in technical contexts theoretically and methodically
• ... document measurement results from the laboratory in a comprehensible and comprehensible manner

Content / sub-modules:
a) Lecture:
Mechanics: Kinematic principles, force, momentum, work, energy, power, conservation laws, impact processes, rotary movements
Mechanics of fluids: Hydrostatics, gravity pressure in liquids and gases Ideal fluids: Continuity equation, Bernoulli equation Real fluids: friction, viscosity, pipe friction, turbulence, similarity
Electricity: charge, coulomb force, electric field, dipole, potential, simple circuits, resistance
Oscillation theory: periodic processes, equation of motion, free and forced harmonic oscillation, damping, resonance
Wave theory: basic concepts, energy transport, propagation, interference
Optics: Geometric optics: imaging, mirrors, lenses, refraction, simple devices (e.g. microscope) Wave optics: reflection, dispersion, interference, diffraction, polarization, radiation

b) laboratory:
Experiments on the topics:
Electricity: voltage, current, resistance, fields
Optics: diffraction, polarization
Vibrations and waves: resonance, damping, wave propagation, standing waves
Thermodynamics: ideal / real gas, calorimetry, changes of state
Fluid mechanics: viscosity
Demonstration experiments: scanning electron microscope

Examination performance / course performance:
a), b) written exam 120 min (graded)
b) all attempts successfully passed with report and oral examination (presentation 10 min)

Analytical chemistry

Requirements:
Recommended: Mathematics, General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry 1 and 2, Physical Chemistry, Physics (or equivalent knowledge of vibration theory, evaluation of measurements, calculation of errors), inorganic chemistry

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...

Knowledge and understanding
• Understand the fundamental importance of analytical chemistry and instrumental analysis within the subject.
• Understand the basics of instrumental analysis, especially spectroscopy and chromatography.
• Know and understand important spectroscopic and chromatographic analysis methods and their basic principles
• Recognize the advantages and disadvantages of the respective analytical methods.
• Develop an understanding of the relationships between molecular structure and spectroscopic and / or chromatographic behavior.
• Recognize and understand the fundamental importance of applied statistics within the entire degree program.
• Recognize and calculate the basic, different questions from statistics.

Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
• explain the basic procedure of a spectroscopic or chromatographic analysis and understand the relationships within the analysis.
• Develop an analysis strategy taking into account various boundary conditions and qualitative requirements.
• Perform calculations and evaluations in the context of spectroscopic or chromatographic analyzes.
• propose suitable analysis methods for a specific investigation task.
• Recognize and classify connections between different analytical processes and within the framework of the subject.
• Recognize and classify relationships between various statistical methods and within the framework of the subject.

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• be able to suggest suitable analysis methods for a specific investigation task.
• Justify the selection of a proposed investigation method theoretically and methodologically on the basis of its advantages and disadvantages.
• Recognize possible approaches for statistical solutions and take them into account when carrying out tests and product quality statements.

Content / sub-modules:
a) Lecture:
Introduction (goals of analytical chemistry, analysis strategy, excitation and detection), spectroscopic methods (Lambert-Beer law, UV / VIS absorption spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, emission spectroscopy), chromatography (theory of chromatography Gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, ion chromatography)
b) Lecture:
Basics of probability theory: random events, probability, random variable, density function, distribution function (binomial distribution, Poisson distribution, normal distribution, etc.)
Judicial statistics: sample selection, parameter estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests
Appendix: Statistics functions in Excel

Examination performance / course performance:
a) and b) written exam 90 min (graded)

Material testing of paints

Requirements:
Compulsory: organic chemistry, general chemistry, physical chemistry, macromolecular chemistry, physics, mathematics

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...
Knowledge and understanding
• ... explain the basic procedure for material testing for paints, coating materials, coatings and printing inks and understand the interrelationships within the specialist area.
• ... describe the fundamentals of colorimetry, gloss measurement, rheological examinations and application tests on coating materials and coatings.
•… demonstrate basic knowledge in the examination of paints, coating materials, coatings and printing inks.
• ... recognize the importance of testing paints, coating materials, coatings and printing inks.
• ... understand and explain colorimetric, rheological, mechanical and chemical test methods and the behavior of materials.

Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
•… apply materials testing methods.
•… create reports and presentations.
• ... analyze problems and evaluate measurement results with the help of Excel.
• ... analyze measurement results with mathematical models.
• ... recognize and classify connections.
• ... understand the fundamentals of material testing for paints, coating materials, coatings and printing inks.
• ... analyze technical problems and derive or develop solutions.
•… adopt different ways of looking at a situation, weigh them up against each other and evaluate them.
• ... familiarize themselves with new ideas and topics based on their basic knowledge.

Scientific innovation
•… use measuring methods and devices in order to gain new knowledge.
• ... model and optimize the behavior of systems and materials.
•… set up hypothesis tests.
• ... independently develop approaches for new concepts and assess their suitability.
• ... calibrate measuring devices and improve their methodological skills.

Communication and cooperation
• ... actively communicate within an organization and obtain information.
•… assess the results of the material test and draw permissible conclusions.
•… use the knowledge, skills and competencies you have learned to evaluate issues and interpret them according to different points of view.
• ... present technical content and discuss it in a professional manner.
•… communicate and cooperate in the group in order to find adequate solutions for the task at hand.

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• ... derive decision recommendations from a societal and ethical perspective based on the analyzes and evaluations made.
• ... give a theoretical and methodological explanation of the approach that has been developed.
• ... reflect on and assess one's own abilities in a group comparison.

Content / sub-modules:
a) Seminar materials testing paints:
Basics of material testing, recipe calculation, color and gloss, rheology and rheometry (Newtonian behavior, shear thickening, shear thinning, apparent flow limit, ramp test, oscillation test), dispersion and dispersion control, color strength development, particle size measurement, production of test panels, film formation, drying, crosslinking and hardening, hardening , Hiding power, mechanical properties (hardness, flexibility, elasticity, scratch and impact resistance), adhesion, chemical resistance, weather resistance and weathering, quality assurance
b) Laboratory material testing of paints:
Carrying out tests for mechanical material testing (hardness, flexibility, adhesion, etc.), colorimetry and gloss measurement, rheology, resistance tests, drying time, layer thickness measurement, microscopy, dispersion, particle size measurement, interfacial and surface tension, curing conditions, etc.

Examination performance / course performance:
a) and b) written exam 90 min (graded)
b) all attempts and tasks successfully passed with report and presentation

Binders and pigments

Requirements:
compulsory: modules of the 1st to 2nd semester

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...

Knowledge and understanding
• ... define the basic terms used in the subject areas of binders and pigments
•… assign individual binder and pigment types to superordinate classes and place them in the overall area.
• ... explain the tasks of binders and pigments in paints and their coating.
• ... describe the physical, chemical, application and safety features of binders and pigments
• ... have basic knowledge of the production or extraction of binders and pigments.
• ... understand the relationship between the structural structure of a binder and the application properties of coatings made from it.
• ... name and explain methods for characterizing binders.
• ... understand and explain the states of consistency and distribution as well as the film formation of binders
• ... explain the mechanisms of color and effect creation as well as the background coverage by pigments in coatings.
• ... understand the mechanisms of protective and other functional properties of pigments in coatings.
• ... understand the different approaches and procedures involved in the aftertreatment of pigments.

Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
• ... learn the practical methods of manufacturing and characterizing binders and pigments in a laboratory based on their basic knowledge.
•… calculate analytical key figures of binders on the basis of recipes.

Contents:
a) Binder molar mass and glass transition temperature, consistency and processing conditions, film formation, binder analysis, technical and safety-relevant data, natural resins, bitumen, tar and pitch, fats, oils, modified carbohydrates and proteins, polyesters and alkyd resins, formaldehyde condensation resins, polyamides and polyimides, polyorganosiloxanes, Epoxy resins, isocyanates and polyurethanes, polymerization resins, radiation-curable acrylate resins
b) Pigments General phys. and chemical properties, optical properties, fastness properties, white pigments, black pigments, inorganic colored pigments, organic colored pigments, luster pigments, special pigments, fillers

Examination performance / course performance:
a) and b) written exam 120 min (graded)

Basics of paint formulation

Requirements:
Recommended: modules organic chemistry 1 + 2 or equivalent knowledge

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...

Knowledge and understanding
• ... explain the basic procedure for the formulation of lacquers and paints.
• ... understand the relationships within the paint formulation.
• ... describe the basics of raw material science and raw material interactions.
•… demonstrate basic knowledge of how raw materials work.
• ... recognize the importance of formulation in the manufacture and research and development of paints and varnishes.
•… calculate recipes stoichiometrically.
•… evaluate recipes.

Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
•… apply stoichiometric relationships.
•… create reports and presentations.
•… propose recipe optimization.
• ... recognize and classify relationships between individual raw material components.
• ... understand the basics of paint formulation.
• ... analyze problems with the paint quality and derive or develop solutions.
•… take different perspectives and points of view towards a paint result, weigh them up against each other and make an assessment.
• ... familiarize themselves with new ideas and topics based on their basic knowledge.

Scientific innovation
•… apply methods and tools to gain new knowledge in the field of lacquers and paints.
•… create new recipes.
•… optimize paint formulas.
• ... independently develop approaches for new paint recipes and assess their suitability.
•… develop concepts for optimizing the recipe.
•… improve recipes.

Communication and cooperation
• ... actively communicate within the paint community and obtain information.
•… interpret results and draw reasonable conclusions.
•… use the knowledge, skills and competencies you have learned to evaluate paint formulations and interpret them according to other criteria.
• ... present technical content and discuss it professionally.
•… communicate and cooperate in a specialist group in order to find adequate solutions for the task at hand.

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• ... derive decision recommendations based on the analyzes and evaluations made, also from ecological and safety-relevant perspectives.
• ... give a theoretical and methodological explanation of the approach that has been developed.
• ... reflect on, assess and defend one's own abilities in a group comparison.

Contents:
a) Lecture basics of paint formulation:
Introduction (film formation, adhesion), paint solvents (organic solvents, water), additives I (wetting and dispersing agents, stabilization of disperse systems), surface treatment of pigments and fillers, additives II (leveling agents, defoamers, rheological additives, etc.), paint formulation formulation, paint production, solvent-based lacquers [physically drying systems, oxidatively curing alkyd resin lacquers, 2K systems (epoxy, polyurethane), stoving lacquers], aqueous lacquers [physically drying systems, silicate paints, oxidatively curing alkyd resin lacquers, hybrids, 2K systems (epoxy, polyurethane), stoving lacquers], solvent-free coatings (2K systems, UV-curing coatings, powder coatings)

Examination performance / course performance:
Exam 90 min. (Graded)

Materials (1)

Pre-condition:
Compulsory: organic chemistry, general chemistry, physical chemistry, macromolecular chemistry, physics, mathematics

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...
Knowledge and understanding
• ... explain the basic procedure for applying the chemistry and physics of interfaces and colloids as well as rheology to paints, coating materials and printing inks and understand the relationships with materials testing and formulation.
• ... have basic knowledge of the chemistry and physics of interfaces and colloids (including the rheology sub-area)
• ... understand and explain rheological behavior and methods
• ... understand and explain interface phenomena in surface coating
•… understand and explain methods of particle analysis and the stabilization of particle dispersions.
• ... define terms in the field of polymer materials
• ... classify the economic importance of polymer materials
• ... name plastics and use standardized abbreviations
• ... describe the material and structural composition of bulk and technical plastics
•… understand how the structure and thermal-mechanical properties of polymer materials are related
•… demonstrate basic knowledge of thermal and mechanical test methods
• ... understand and explain the deformation and strength characteristics of polymer materials
-
Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
•… apply chemical and physical laws in the area of ​​coating materials, printing inks and polymer materials.
•… create reports and presentations.
•… analyze solutions.
• ... recognize and classify connections.
•… understand the basics of the subject.
• ... analyze technical problems and derive or develop solutions.
•… take different perspectives and points of view towards a situation, weigh them up against each other and make an assessment.
• ... familiarize themselves with new ideas and topics based on their basic knowledge.

Scientific innovation
•… apply methods and procedures in order to gain new knowledge in the field of materials.
•… develop model concepts for the behavior of paints, coating materials, coatings, printing inks and polymer materials.
• ... optimize these systems.
•… critically assess your own hypotheses.
• ... independently develop approaches for new concepts and assess their suitability.
•… concepts for optimizing the above Develop systems.

Communication and cooperation
•… actively communicate and obtain information within a coating / printing ink industry.
•… interpret results and draw reasonable conclusions.
•… use the knowledge, skills and competences you have learned to evaluate problem analyzes and approaches and interpret them from other perspectives.
• ... present technical content and discuss it professionally.
•… communicate and cooperate in the group in order to find adequate solutions for the task at hand.

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• ... derive decision recommendations from a societal and ethical perspective based on the analyzes and evaluations made.
• ... give a theoretical and methodological explanation of the approach that has been developed.
• ... reflect on and assess one's own abilities in a group comparison.

Content / sub-modules:
a) Lecture interfaces and colloids:
Intermolecular interactions, interfacial tensions and interfacial energies - theoretical principles and measurement methods, wetting, adhesion, flow, activation of surfaces, size ranges, colloid chemistry in paints, measurement of particle sizes, stabilization of colloids, pigment particles in paint (dispersion, dispersing machines, rheology and rheometry, rheological measurement methods, rheology of pigment dispersions, coloristics, control of flow behavior.
b) Lecture polymer materials:
Definitions, classification, labeling and standardization, economic significance, plastic waste treatment, polymer base and additives, structural features, movement mechanisms of macromolecules, amorphous and crystalline phases, crystallization, networks, polymer mixtures, blowing agents and foams, reinforcing agents and composite materials, thermal state and transition areas, mechanical Behavior and dependence on material influences as well as temperature and time, strength and deformation parameters, relaxation, explanatory models

Examination performance / course performance:
a) written exam 60 min. (graded)
b) written exam 60 min. (graded)

Application technology

Requirements:
Recommended: modules physics, physical chemistry, materials testing paints

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...

Knowledge and understanding
• ... understand the basic operational requirements for the application of paints
• ... understand the physical principles and procedural implementations of the various application techniques.

Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
•… weigh up and assess the advantages and disadvantages of the various application techniques against each other
• ... recognize the classification of the application technology within the painting process chain and determine the relationships with upstream and downstream processes
• ... recognize the effects on the environment

Scientific innovation
•… apply and interpret quality assurance methods, such as statistical test planning or measuring equipment capability
• ... recognize future automation options and concepts
• ... recognize possible approaches for simulation processes and their integration into a digitized environment

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• ... select application techniques based on the knowledge acquired
• ... give technical reasons for the selection on an engineering basis
• ... support and manage paint-related plans and projects

Content / sub-modules:
a) Lecture application technology:
Basics of the various application methods
Effects on occupational safety and environmental protection
Aspects of automation and process integration
Quality assurance methods (statistical test planning)

Examination performance / course performance:
Exam 90 min (graded)

Paint technology

Requirements:
Compulsory: Exam basics of paint formulation (hardship regulation possible via entrance colloquium)
Recommended: Modules materials, binders and pigments, materials testing of paints

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...

Knowledge and understanding
• ... explain the basic procedure of paint technology in theory and practice.
• ... understand the relationships within the paint formulation through the internship.
• ... describe the basics of handling and using paint raw materials and their interactions.
•… deal with paint raw materials practically.
• ... recognize relationships between raw materials and their effects.
•… create, calculate and evaluate paint formulas.
• ... explain the theoretical fundamentals of powder coatings within the framework of the lecture “Technology of Coatings”.

Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
• ... evaluate raw material properties.
•… create reports according to scientific standards.
•… optimize recipes.
• ... recognize and evaluate relationships between the formulation and the paint properties.
• ... understand the basics of paint production on a laboratory scale.
• ... understand the basics of a job in the field of paint R&D.
• ... analyze problems with the paint quality and derive or develop solutions.
• ... evaluate the special features of powder coatings in their manufacture, application and final properties.

Scientific innovation
•… apply methods and tools to gain new knowledge in the field of lacquers and paints.
•… create new, improved recipes.
•… optimize paint formulas.
•… make predictions of certain recipe changes.
• ... independently develop approaches for new paint recipes and assess their suitability.
•… optimize paint properties using different methods.

Communication and cooperation
• ... actively communicate within the paint community and obtain information.
•… interpret results.
•… use the knowledge, skills and competencies you have learned to evaluate paint formulations and application conditions and interpret them according to other criteria.
•… present and discuss technical content.
•… communicate and cooperate in the group in order to find adequate solutions for the task at hand.

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• ... derive decision recommendations based on the analyzes and evaluations made, also from ecological and safety-relevant perspectives.
• ... give a theoretical and methodological explanation of the approach that has been developed.
• ... reflect on, assess and defend one's own abilities in a group comparison.

Content / sub-modules:
a) Seminar on paint production:
In preparation for and accompanying the paint production laboratory (c), the seminar discusses test regulations, works out recipes, addresses safety-relevant aspects and discusses methods of evaluation. In addition, the students give short lectures on scientific articles or as a presentation of the results of laboratory tests. The seminar forms the framework for questions, interpretations of results and possible further procedures
b) Lecture Technology of Paints:
Powder coatings are the focus of the lecture. Theoretical backgrounds are laid, economic and ecological advantages of powder coatings are discussed, the special manufacturing and application processes are presented and interest in the topic is to be aroused.
c) Lacquer manufacture laboratory:
Formulation of a wide variety of paint formulations (solvent-based, water-based, one-component, two-component, room temperature curing, stoving varnishes, UV varnishes)
Different manufacturing processes for liquid paints in different mixing units and scales under laboratory conditions should be learned.
The clean and therefore safe handling of hazardous substances is learned.

Examination performance / course performance:

a), b) and c) written exam 120 min (graded)
c) all attempts successfully passed with report and presentation

Corrosion protection

Requirements:
Compulsory: Solid knowledge of physical chemistry and paint technology

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...

Knowledge and understanding
• ... understand and describe the physico-chemical mechanisms of corrosion.
• ... understand and describe the corrosion protection behavior of metals.
• ... understand and describe corrosion protection measures and their mechanisms of action.

Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
• ... understand the fundamentals of thermodynamics and kinetics of corrosion.
•… apply the physico-chemical principles of corrosion to specific forms of corrosion.
• ... evaluate the influencing factors and the risk of corrosion processes in practice.
•… select suitable materials for practical application conditions.
•… select and evaluate suitable corrosion protection measures.
• ... familiarize themselves with new ideas and topics based on their basic knowledge.

Scientific innovation
• ... independently develop approaches for new concepts and assess their suitability.
•… develop concepts for the selection of materials and for the optimization of corrosion protection measures.
•… apply the approaches you have learned to new practical problems.

Communication and cooperation
•… use the knowledge, skills and competencies you have learned to evaluate corrosion and corrosion protection and interpret them from other points of view.
•… communicate and cooperate in the group in order to find adequate solutions for the task at hand.

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• ... give a theoretical and methodological explanation of the approach that has been developed.
• ... reflect on and assess one's own abilities in a group comparison.

Content / sub-modules:
a) Lecture on corrosion protection:
Part 1: Corrosion
Homogeneous corrosion of metals in aqueous solutions
Thermodynamics of electrochemical reactions
Kinetics of electrochemical reactions
measuring technology
Acid corrosion, oxygen corrosion, alkali corrosion
Heterogeneous corrosion of metals in aqueous solutions
Galvanic corrosion
Selective corrosion
Ventilation corrosion
Passivity of metals
Local destruction of the passive layer
Intergranular corrosion Pitting corrosion
Stress corrosion cracking
Atmospheric corrosion
General influencing variables on the corrosion behavior of metallic materials
Part 2: Corrosion protection
Material selection and corrosion protection-compliant design
Corrosion protection through inhibitors
Electrochemical corrosion protection
Surface preparation for passive corrosion protection
Chemical surface pretreatment
Corrosion protection through organic coatings
Duplex systems

Examination performance / course performance:
Exam 60 min (graded)

Analytics and environmental protection

Requirements:
Recommended: preliminary course in mathematics / preliminary course in physics / modules of the 1st to 2nd semester
Mathematics, general chemistry, organic chemistry 1 and 2, physical chemistry, physics, inorganic chemistry, occupational safety and environmental protection, analytical chemistry

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...

Knowledge and understanding
• ... understand and explain the importance of instrumental analysis as a branch of analytical chemistry.
• ... describe and apply the most important methods of instrumental analysis, especially in the areas of chromatography, electrochemistry, spectroscopy and thermal analysis.
• ... name the advantages and disadvantages of the different chromatographic techniques and their areas of application.
• ... understand and explain the importance of instrumental analysis as a cross-sectional discipline for applications in a wide variety of specialist areas.
•… apply the most important statistical evaluation methods and use them to assess the quality of the analysis results obtained.
•… apply spectroscopic methods to different questions and use their potential for the identification of unknown molecules and their quantitative determination.
• ... record the diversity of the environmental protection department and reflect its importance for the protection of air, water and soil.

Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
•… use different techniques of instrumental analysis independently in order to record inorganic and organic analytes in different matrices, especially environmentally relevant samples.
• ... make the decision which type of sampling and preparation should be made for different analytical questions.
• ... assess which analysis methods are suitable for the respective issues to be dealt with.
• ... understand which questions from the field of environmental protection can be dealt with analytically.
• ... name the advantages and disadvantages of individual analytical methods and understand the advantages of combining different methods.
•… carry out qualitative and quantitative evaluations.
• ... assess the results obtained using statistical methods and put them into the legal context.
• ... assess the potential of instrumental analysis for your own, but also for other departments, in order to use resulting synergies and develop solution-oriented analysis strategies.
• ... assess the importance of environmental protection on a political, economic and social level.

Scientific innovation
• ... record which methods can be used to optimize existing analytical processes in order to improve chromatographic separations and further develop their performance.

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• ... develop a problem-related, solution-oriented analysis strategy and select suitable instrumental analytical procedures
• ... assess the measurement results obtained on the basis of the analyzes carried out.
•… select the appropriate statistical methods to classify the robustness, precision and accuracy of the data and the method used.

Contents:
a) Lecture on environmental protection:
Creation of air pollution and effects on various environmental media, limitation of emissions through primary and secondary measures, basic principles of recycling technology, introduction to the circular economy, creation and avoidance of (micro) plastic, production-integrated measures for wastewater and waste reduction, basic features of chemical-physical wastewater treatment .
b) Lecture Instrumental Analytics:
Sampling and preparation (errors in sampling, techniques, method selection)
quality control
Chromatographic methods (HPTLC, HPLC, GC) and selection of detection systems
Electroanalytical methods (polarography, potentiometry, amperometry, electrophoresis)
Mass spectrometry
Thermal analysis (DTA, DSC, TGA)
special analysis techniques and coupling methods
chemometric methods, measurement errors (standard deviation, error propagation, confidence interval, detection and quantification limit), calibration
Statistical test methods (t-test, F-test, outlier tests, standard addition)
c) Laboratory for instrumental analysis and environmental analysis:
Attempts at: UV / VIS absorption spectroscopy, IR absorption spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), gas chromatography (GC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC), applied HPLC, ion chromatography as an application method, polarography and thermal analysis.

Examination performance / course performance:
a), b) and c) written exam 120 min. (graded)
c) all tests passed successfully with preparation of an analysis report

Materials (2)

Pre-condition:
Compulsory: organic chemistry, general chemistry, physical chemistry, macromolecular chemistry, physics, mathematics

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...
Knowledge and understanding
• ... explain the basic procedure for applying the chemistry and physics of interfaces and colloids as well as rheology to paints, coating materials and printing inks and understand the relationships with materials testing and formulation.
• ... have basic knowledge of the chemistry and physics of interfaces and colloids (including the rheology sub-area)
• ... understand and explain rheological behavior and methods
• ... understand and explain interface phenomena in surface coating
•… understand and explain methods of particle analysis and the stabilization of particle dispersions.
• ... define terms in the field of polymer materials
• ... classify the economic importance of polymer materials
• ... name plastics and use standardized abbreviations
• ... describe the material and structural composition of bulk and technical plastics
•… understand how the structure and thermal-mechanical properties of polymer materials are related
•… demonstrate basic knowledge of thermal and mechanical test methods
• ... understand and explain the deformation and strength characteristics of polymer materials
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Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
•… apply chemical and physical laws in the area of ​​coating materials, printing inks and polymer materials.
•… create reports and presentations.
•… analyze solutions.
• ... recognize and classify connections.
•… understand the basics of the subject.
• ... analyze technical problems and derive or develop solutions.
•… take different perspectives and points of view towards a situation, weigh them up against each other and make an assessment.
• ... familiarize themselves with new ideas and topics based on their basic knowledge.
Scientific innovation
•… apply methods and procedures in order to gain new knowledge in the field of materials.
•… develop model concepts for the behavior of paints, coating materials, coatings, printing inks and polymer materials.
• ... optimize these systems.
•… critically assess your own hypotheses.
• ... independently develop approaches for new concepts and assess their suitability.
•… concepts for optimizing the above Develop systems.
Communication and cooperation
•… actively communicate and obtain information within a coating / printing ink industry.
•… interpret results and draw reasonable conclusions.
•… use the knowledge, skills and competences you have learned to evaluate problem analyzes and approaches and interpret them from other perspectives.
• ... present technical content and discuss it professionally.
•… communicate and cooperate in the group in order to find adequate solutions for the task at hand.
Scientific self-image / professionalism
• ... derive decision recommendations from a societal and ethical perspective based on the analyzes and evaluations made.
• ... give a theoretical and methodological explanation of the approach that has been developed.
• ... reflect on and assess one's own abilities in a group comparison.

Contents:
a) Lecture interfaces and colloids:
Intermolecular interactions, interfacial tensions and interfacial energies - theoretical principles and measurement methods, wetting, adhesion, flow, activation of surfaces, size ranges, colloid chemistry in paints, measurement of particle sizes, stabilization of colloids, pigment particles in paint (dispersion, dispersing machines, rheology and rheometry, rheological measurement methods, rheology of pigment dispersions, coloristics, control of flow behavior.
b) Lecture polymer materials:
Definitions, classification, labeling and standardization, economic significance, plastic waste treatment, polymer base and additives, structural features, movement mechanisms of macromolecules, amorphous and crystalline phases, crystallization, networks, polymer mixtures, blowing agents and foams, reinforcing agents and composite materials, thermal state and transition areas, mechanical Behavior and dependence on material influences as well as temperature and time, strength and deformation parameters, relaxation, explanatory models

Examination performance / course performance:
a) written exam 60 min. (graded)
b) written exam 60 min. (graded)

Practical semester

Requirements:
compulsory: modules of the 1st and 2nd semester
Recommended: modules of the 3rd and 4th semester

Learning outcomes and competencies
After successfully completing the module, students can ...
Knowledge and understanding
•… assign tasks to the correct subject areas. (a)
• ... read and understand English specialist literature. (c)
•… understand the fundamentals and models of (operational) communication. (d)
•… classify organizational and communication structures in companies. (d)
• ... understand the importance of soft skills in the world of work and when entering the world of work (applications). (d)
• ... recognize your own communication behavior and the background to it (biological and social / cultural factors and historical development, influence of clichés and stereotypes). (d)
• ... describe argumentation and negotiation techniques. (d)
• ... gain an overview of psychological test procedures, especially when selecting applicants and in human resource management. (d)

Use, application and generation of knowledge
Use and transfer
•… apply the specialist knowledge and methods that have been learned. (a)
• ... evaluate solutions and approaches. (a)
• ... recognize your own potential (analyze your own peculiarities, "strengths" and "weaknesses", position yourself in comparison to others), especially in the context of application situations. (d)

Scientific innovation

•… to use methods of chemistry, technology of lacquers, coatings and materials. (a)

Communication and cooperation
• ... document, present and discuss technical content. (away)
• ... solve technical problems in a discourse with specialist representatives and non-specialists. (a)
• ... justify their position in a technically and methodically sound manner. (a)
•… consider different perspectives and include them in the lines of argument. (a)
•… present technical content in English and discuss it professionally. (c)
•… develop the basics of team and employee management. (d)
•… use argumentation and negotiation techniques. (d)
• ... recognize and consider intercultural aspects in communication. (d)

Scientific self-image / professionalism
• ... justify their professional actions with the theories and methods they have learned. (a)
•… apply the acquired skills in a professional environment and compare and reflect on their level of development with the necessary skills. (a)
• ... abstract and classify communication processes and management structures in companies and organizations. (d)
•… make sensible use of freedom of choice under supervision. (a)
• ... justify their decisions not only professionally but also in relation to social expectations and norms. (a)

Content / sub-modules:
a) Business practice: 100 days of presence in a company
"Training on the job", work on a project under the guidance of an in-house trainer. During the time in the company, each student is looked after by professors from the faculty.
b) Lecture presentation and publication: Organization of scientific activity, documentation (laboratory journal, documentation, literature research, reports), types of publication (internal report, practical semester report, bachelor thesis, publication in specialist journals, etc.), presentation techniques (lectures, design of slides, etc.).
After completing the internship semester, the students give presentations in this course on the activities in the internship semester.
The course takes place before the 100 days of attendance.
c) Lecture in English: Reading, writing, and discussing a variety of topics
d) Communication lecture: The focus of the lecture is in the field of work, business and organizational psychology (e.g. organizational behavior, forms and processes of communication in companies and organizations, company structure and corporate culture, leadership models, behavior in groups, work motivation, intercultural aspects of communication). The lecture combines theoretical knowledge with exercises, self-awareness and discussions, e.g. by carrying out selected psychological test procedures and (anonymized) feedback of the results to the participants.

Examination performance / course performance:
a), b) Report and presentation (ungraded) (b) Compulsory attendance
c) Presentation (ungraded)
d) housework (ungraded)



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